Can you foresee and prevent threats? by Denida Zinxhiria


As security professionals we all know that the number one responsibility in providing security details is the ability to prevent a threat before it endangers you and your client. No matter how adept you are in close combat skills or the use of firearms when that horrific Moment of Commitment comes (the aggressor pulls a weapon and begins shooting), your skills are not enough; this has been proven to be the fact in studies and in practice. How a gunshot or a physical combat will end depends on different factors such as the environment, the number of enemies, the number of rounds each party has, what kind of, if any support you have and most importantly your psychological response during an attack. Believe it or not we have seen security professionals ‘’freeze’’ during a gun battle. Were they trained in firearms? Yes!  Were they trained in close combat? Yes!  So, what went wrong? The most important question is, can we risk engaging ourselves in a situation that will most likely end violently for us and our clients? How many ‘’clients’’ or security operatives have come through a gun battle completely safe after having engaged in one? I am still searching to find that one case……


It is safer to prevent a threat instead of reacting to it! The best security details are not those based in force or use of firearms, but those based on foreseeing the upcoming threat and preventing it. We should also not forget that in some countries our colleagues are not permitted to carry or use firearms, so they must use their brains and intel.


Can we get training to foresee and prevent a threat? Yes we can!


I had the opportunity to attend one of ESI’s classes this weekend and meet Mr. John D. Byrnes. Mr. Byrnes is the founder of the Center for Aggression Management. The Center provides training and systems for use in avoiding and preventing violence in areas such as workplace, campus and school environment to provide more effective, lower impact methods for confronting aggressors and de-escalating aggression.


Most importantly this training can be taught to a wide area of professionals and organizations. I would personally and highly recommend this training to EVERYONE who would like to feel safer regardless his or her professional background.


No matter what our profession, age, sex, culture or country we live in, we all have to deal at some point in our lives with aggressive individuals; either as criminals, colleagues or family members. As a woman I can see multiple uses of Mr. Byrnes’ Critical Aggression Prevention System (CAPS).


As a security professional I can assure you that this training will change the way you have been looking at things and suspects. At some point we all have been trained in how to identify suspects and how to deal with them. Most schools still teach profiling, mostly when it comes to terrorists and suicide bombers.


Personally I was never a believer in using profiling. Why? Simply because there has not been an accurate “terrorist profile!” All profile assessments that have studied terrorists have been done so after they were captured. In psychology it is well known that you cannot obtain real research facts from an subject who (study object-terrorist) is not a willing participant ….


What about those situations when you are dealing with the occasional threat of aggression? Imagine being with your client in a pub where people get drunk and became aggressive, or at a football stadium? Being able to understand and ‘’read’’ aggression escalation is essential so as to maintain a safe environment for your client, you and others who could otherwise be injured.  Identifying emerging aggression, engaging and preventing a possible attack offers a much better solution than pulling your firearm and pointing it at prospective aggressor. 


Remember, we are security professionals, we are not Law Enforcement or Federal Agents, depending upon our country of operations, our duties and actions can be so limited by the law and have no more authority than any other professional such as bus driver.


In cases that you cannot restrain, handcuff or point a firearm against an aggressive suspect you must have other tools to defend yourself and your client. Critical Aggression Prevention System will not only teach you how to identify and respond in those situations, but will also teach you how to identify aggressive levels in yourself and how to control them. We are humans too and when an aggressor, whose adrenaline is already surging, it is a natural response for our adrenaline to rise as it prepares us for attack!  We can get aggressive as well when we are offended, threaten or our interests are limited. So by learning how to control our aggression brings us to a much higher professional level. The one who control his or her temper and calmness is the professional one. The one that can maintain their calm will make better decisions, and when it comes to our professional area, the one who will make the safest decisions.


Soon we will be hosting an interview with Mr. Byrnes, until then you can find out more about his work and the Center for Aggression Management at http://www.aggressionmanagement.com/index.html or learn more about their training at http://www.aggressionmanagement.com/USF_OTIECMainPage.html









Author:  Denida Zinxhiria

Director of Placement and Services at Executive Security International



  1. Executive Security International
  2. Albanian Centre of Studies Against Terrorism and Organised Crime
  3. Alaskan-Aegean Energy Resources Utilization, LLC

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