Campus Safety Magazine article states,

It’s Unclear if CU Considered Holmes ‘High Risk.’


It is unclear whether Dr. Lynne Fenton believed Holmes was a Level 4 threat — which the University of Colorado’s Behavioral Evaluation and Threat Assessment (BETA) team defines as “high risk,” requiring a law enforcement response — or if she was just contacting police not connected to the team’s “Threat Assessment Matrix” guidelines, ABC News reports. The BETA team did not meet about Holmes or notify Aurora police when he left school.


Two weeks ago, a CU spokesperson said there were no guidelines for when the BETA team must meet and that the threat assessment matrix is a best practices document the team tried follow in most cases.


If you agree with the US Secret Service and the US Department of Education Study’s, “Safe School Initiative” Study findings:


“An inquiry should focus instead on the student’s behaviors and communication to determine if the student appears to be planning or preparing for an attack. . . . The ultimate question to answer . . . is whether a student is on a path to a violent attack, and if so, to determine how fast they are moving and where intervention may be possible”  


You may conclude there was not the means to effectively judge whether an individual (James Holmes) is on a “path to a violent attack” and therefore find it incredibly difficult to judge whether action must be taken and with what urgency.  This is why we developed the Aggression Continuum and separated Primal (adrenaline-driven) Aggression from Cognitive (intent-driven) Aggression.  To learn more, please review our 3-minute CAPS Impact Movie: www.AggressionManagement.com/movie/

One Comment

  1. james

    Bravo! The return of common-sense problem-solving!
    “Helpless thinking” only provides excuses for giving up. Imagine if workers at a clinic for autistic children felt the same way as many clinicians feel about violence and human aggression?
    It reminds me of something similar to what George Orwell once said: It takes vigilance and effort to see what is under one’s own nose.

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