Can We Prevent The Loss Of Life On Our Campuses Due To A Shooter? The answer is . . .


Research has determined that from the Moment of Commitment (the point when a student pulls his weapon and begins firing) to the Moment of Completion (when the last round is discharged) is only 5 seconds. If it is the intent of institutions of higher education to react to this violence, they will do so over the wounded and/or slain bodies of students, faculty, staff and counselors.


Institutions of Higher Education clearly want safe and secure campuses. Members of student affairs are perennially queried by parents about the safety of their campuses. The commonplace answers, intended to reassure anxious parents, focus on the campus police officers and emergency procedures. While useful, these less than adequate efforts do not begin to provide a definitive answer to preventing campuses violence, nor do they make a campus safe and secure.


Traditionally institutions of higher learning have relied upon the mental health community or local police to keep them safe, yet one of the key shortcomings has been the lack of a system that involves faculty, student affairs, counselors and students in the identification and communication process. Recently, colleges, universities and community colleges have begun forming Behavioral Intervention Teams with representatives from all these constituencies. Yet, most have not.


They simply changed their safety/security policies, procedures, or surveillance systems, and they continue spending excessive amounts of money to put in place many of the physical security options. Sadly, these steps are reactionary only and do little to prevent aggression because they are designed exclusively to react to existing conflict, threat and violence. These schools reflect a national blindspot, which prefers hardening targets through enhanced security versus preventing violence with efforts directed at aggressors. Security gets all the focus and money, but this only makes us feel safe, rather than to actually make us safer.


Read our white paper and let us know your thoughts . . .


For a comprehensive and free look at the problem and its solution, www.aggressionmanagement.com/Higher_Education/

37 Comments

  1. John D Byrnes

    Yes, Yachtcharter, we believe that a shooter can be identified and prior to the horrific Moment of Commitment and prevented.  The Center for Aggression Management has the only Aggression Continuum, which provides the means to “foresee” aggression at any level, permitting Aggression Managers the ability to engage and prevent any level of aggression, whether the aggression is conflict, bullying, assaultive and even a shooter.

  2. John D. Byrnes

    Although I am not sure I understand your question, the basis of our work is how to prevent aggression and violence.

  3. Great info. I like all your post. I will keep visiting this blog very often. It is good to see you verbalize from the heart and your clarity on this important subject can be easily observed..

  4. Just curious, when public safety officials don’t utilize the tools you’ve developed to identify those prone to intent-driven aggression, do you experience an adrenaline-driven response? Not to make light of the subject, but I can’t imagine the frustration. Keep up the good work.

  5. John D Byrnes

    You are absolutely right; it is very frustrating as our government (public safety officials) continues to use an incomplete system as they permit these critical gaps to remain.  It will only happen when good people, like yourself, get involved and spread the message.  Possibly this message will go viral and have enough impact to move these bureaucrats, including all public safety officials to reconsider these skills and methods.  

  6. How tragically ironic. Our universities will utilize every state-of-the-art tool and technique to develop healthy minds. But, they ignore cutting edge approaches to identifying unhealthy minds. And, as a result, many minds are unnecessarily lost.

  7. I applaud the good efforts made by some of the schools to have the Behavioral Intervention Teams. Indeed, the aggressive behaviour as exhibited by some students does not happen overnight. Signs would have been revealed through their interactions with others in school. I believe with the setting up of Behavioral Intervention Teams all over the schools, the aggressive behavior can be brought under control.

  8. I applaud the good efforts made by some of the schools to have the Behavioral Intervention Teams. Indeed, the aggressive behaviour as exhibited by some students does not happen overnight. Signs would have been revealed through their interactions with others in school. I believe with the setting up of Behavioral Intervention Teams all over the schools, the aggressive behavior can be brought under control.

  9. John D. Byrnes

    Thank you, Micheil for your insightful comments.  Although it is true that humans can be very subjective it is our objective to offer them “objective observables.”  These are predicated on scientific cause and effect principles and offer the most reliable predictors we can offer as human beings.  Behavioral Intervention Teams are excellent tools but they too are wrought with subjective references that can quickly overwhelm them. This again is the reason for our Meter of Emerging Aggression, which is built upon the premise of identifying someone “on the path to violent attack;” the only known why to reliably predict the next shooter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *